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Boko Haram: FG Approves Open Trial for 1,000 Suspects

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The Federal Government has approved that the trial of 1,000 suspected Boko Haram insurgents detained in various locations of the country which resumes on Monday should be open a select members of the public and media.

This was disclosed in a statement by the Special Adviser on Media and Publicity to the Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Abubakar Malami (SAN), Mr. Salihu Isah.

He said the second phase of the trial at the Kainji detention facility in Niger State would be witnessed by some invited civil society groups and journalists.

“Unlike the first phase which was restricted, this phase is opened with some civil society groups, including human rights organisations and journalists invited to witness the proceedings”, Mr. Isah stated.

Giving a background to the resumption of the suspected insurgents’ trial, the minister’s media aide explained that it was as a result of the “conclusion of investigation of over 1,000 suspects as ordered by the court during its proceedings of October 2017 by the Office of the Honourable Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice.”

According to the statement, suspects with prima facie cases would be prosecuted while applications would be filed for the discharge of those without prima facie cases.

“Those discharged will undergo a process of de-radicalisation”, he explained.

Isah said the de-radicalisation exercise would be conducted by the Office of the National Security Adviser before the concerned suspects would be released to their various families.

Explaining further, he stated: “Recall, this exercise which is a concerted effort of the Federal Ministry of Justice and the Office of the National Security Adviser kicked off in Kainji, Niger State on Monday, October 9, 2017.

“Four judges were allocated to four dedicated courts to handle the trial located in a military facility in Kainji while defence counsels were provided for those suspects without capacity to hire private legal practitioners to defend them.

“Already, about 82 Boko Haram detainees have so far benefitted from the Federal Government’s window to plead guilty to secure low jail terms or unconditional release which is part of President Muhammadu Buhari administration’s concerted effort to boost its human right records and decongest the nation’s prisons.

“As a result, about 45 convictions have also been pronounced by the trial judges in the four syndicated courts established by then acting Chief Judge of the Federal High Court, Abuja, Justice Abdu Kafarati. The various Boko Haram suspects were sentenced to jail terms ranging from two years to 15 years and with most of them backdated to the date of their detention.

“There are four categories of suspects at the Kainji detention facility who are classified as Boko Haram suspects who were hitherto investigated by the Joint Investigation Team set up by the Defence Headquarters otherwise known as DHQ/JIT.
“The case files of the suspected insurgents were then transmitted to the Honourable Attorney General of the Federation and after a careful review of the cases based on their individual merit, it was discovered that they have no prima facie cases that will sustain a charge against them in any court of law.

“As a result, they were recommended for release and handed over to the Office of the National Security Adviser for rehabilitation and/or de-radicalisation.

“The second category is the set of suspects that the Honourable Attorney General established prima facie cases against and charges already filed at the Federal High Court, Abuja Division, who are also mostly in the detention facility under reference and may be willing to plead guilty for a lesser sentences.

“The third category are the suspects whose case files are either recommended for further investigation or that have no investigation conducted on them at all hence they do not have case files that will warrant the Honourable Attorney General of the Federation to form any opinion in respect of their case.

“Also, the fourth category is that of the suspects whose cases were reviewed and a prima facie were found and may be willing to opt for a full trial.”

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American lawyers drag Buhari, Army Chief, to International Criminal Court (ICC) in Hague

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Bruce Fein, Bruce DelValle & Prof Akujieze of EKWENCHE Org, Chicago, USA

Days after Nigeria’s President, Muhammadu Buhari, issued a controversial order asking the military and the Police to be ruthless and to shoot dead ballot box snatchers, information has emerged that lawyers in America have dragged the President and his Chief of Army Staff, Lt General Tukur Yusuf Buratai to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in Hague.

On 11th February 2019, the Washington-based law firm, Fein & DelValle, acting in concert with Ekwenche Research Institute filed a genocide complaint at the Office of the ICC Chief Prosecutor, Madam Fatou Bensouda.

A statement released by a Nigerian-based human rights organisation, the International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law
(Intersociety) said the genocide complaint was “in response to Nigerian Government ordered genocide and crimes against humanity perpetrated or committed against defenseless citizens of Igbo origin in Eastern Nigeria”.

Extract Of Criminal Complaint Filed At ICC Against PMB, Buratai & Ors

Executive Director of Intersociety, Mr. Emeka Umeagbalasi, said “the horrendous crimes were committed in non-war situation without any form of justification under Nigeria’s extant laws nor international laws, including treaty laws signed and ratified by the Federal Republic of Nigeria.”

The filing of state-crime complaint against the President was in accordance with Article 15 of the ICC Statute of 1998 and based on
“overwhelming evidence” earlier submitted by Mr. Bruce Fein, a former US Associate Attorney General. Fein and his associate, Bruce DelValle were invited by the ICC Chief Prosecutor to The Hague to make their formal presentation. The duos were accompanied by Prof Justin Akujieze, President of Ekwenche Research Institute, and Mr. Luke Nwannunu, Chair of the Genocide Legal Committee of the same
organization.

In June 2017, Ekwenche had filed a civil claimant suit in the US District Court for the District of Columbia. The suit filed on behalf of ten Nigerian families in South East Nigeria whose loved ones were “massacred or grievously tortured by Nigerian security operatives.”

The actions of the American lawyers are based on a two-year research and documentation carried out by the International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law. The rights organization, with a watchdog history spanning over two decades, led the research that produced an 85-page report and another 62 pages of photo album.

The state-crime research is titled: “Under Buhari & Osinbajo: Many Have Gone & Crippled For Life In Eastern Nigeria (Detailed Chronology of Nigerian Military Massacre Operations in Eastern Nigeria: August 2015-Sept. 2017). While the petition to The Hague is filed as “A petition to open an investigation pursuant to Article 15 of the Rome Statue in the Int’l Criminal Court: The Prosecutor V. Muhammadu Buhari, Tukur Buratai & Ors: For Genocide & Crimes Against Humanity in the Federal Republic of Nigeria Against the Igbo People & Biafrans.”

Vice President Yemi and President Muhammadu Buhari

Since 2015, the Nigerian Military has been tarred with accusations of extra-judicial killings, torture and detention of ordinary citizens in South East Nigeria where in 2017 it grabbed international headlines for a widely-condemned operation code-named Python Dance.

Other names in the ICC petition include Solomon Arase and Ibrahim Idris, two former Inspector Generals of Police; and a former Director
General of State Security Service, Lawan Musa Daura.

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Human Rights

Amnesty confirms 60 killed by Boko Haram in Rann

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The false-colour image above highlights the near-infrared band. Healthy vegetation appears red while unhealthy, or burned, areas appear black or brown. On 30 January 2019, hundreds of structures appear heavily burned. Environmental sensors remotely detected fires in the area on 28 and 29 January 2019.

At least 60 people were killed following the 28 January devastating Boko Haram attack on Rann, a border town in Borno state, northeast Nigeria, Amnesty International has confirmed.

The organization also analyzed satellite imagery which shows hundreds of burned structures in the town. Many of the destroyed structures only date back to 2017, suggesting they were shelters for internally displaced people who came to Rann seeking protection.

“We have now confirmed that this week’s attack on Rann was the deadliest yet by Boko Haram, killing at least 60 people. Using satellite imagery we have also been able to confirm the mass burning of structures as Boko Haram unleashed a massive assault on Rann, most of which is now destroyed,” said Osai Ojigho, Director of Amnesty International Nigeria.

Satellite imagery which shows hundreds of burned structures in the town

“This attack on civilians who have already been displaced by the bloody conflict may amount to possible war crime, and those responsible must be brought to justice. Disturbingly, witnesses told us that Nigerian soldiers abandoned their posts the day before the attack, demonstrating the authorities’ utter failure to protect civilians.”

Inadequate security

Alleged withdrawal of troops, triggered a massive exodus of civilians to Cameroon, as fear spread that Boko Haram would take advantage and attack the town. At around 9am on 28 January, a group of Boko Haram fighters arrived on motorcycles. They set houses ablaze and killed those left behind. They also chased after those who attempted to escape and killed some people outside the town.  Eleven bodies were found within Rann town, and 49 bodies were found outside.

The false-colour image above highlights the near-infrared band. Healthy vegetation appears red while unhealthy, or burned, areas appear black or brown. A closer look at one burned area on 30 January 2019 shows the severity of the damage. Many of the structures are new since 2017 suggesting they are shelters for IDPs living in the town.

The false-colour image above highlights the near-infrared band. Healthy vegetation appears red while unhealthy, or burned, areas appear black or brown. A closer look at one burned area on 30 January 2019 shows the severity of the damage. Many of the structures are new since 2017 suggesting they are shelters for IDPs living in the town.

Amnesty International was informed that about 50 people have not been accounted for. Those who took part in the burial explained what they saw.

According to an eyewitness: “Ten of us [Civilian Joint Task Force] came from Cameroon to Rann for the burial. When we arrived, we found and buried 11 corpses within the town, but the soldiers told us that they buried several others yesterday [30 January] who had decayed. Outside the town, we recovered and buried 49 dead bodies all with gunshot wounds.”

Aid agencies have reported that some 30,000 civilians have fled for the border with Cameroon in recent days, joining a further 9,000 who fled Boko Haram’s previous attack on Rann on 14 January.

Satellite evidence of mass burning

Amnesty International analyzed satellite images from 30 January 2019 showing hundreds of structures burned in the east, south and southeast of Rann. Environmental sensors detected fires in the area on 28 and 29 January.

The false-colour image above highlights the near-infrared band. Healthy vegetation appears red while unhealthy, or burned, areas appear black or brown. On 30 January 2019, hundreds of structures appear heavily burned. Environmental sensors remotely detected fires in the area on 28 and 29 January 2019.

In the 14 January attack, Boko Haram burned well over 100 structures in other areas of Rann. These two recent attacks have left most of the town heavily damaged or destroyed.

Amnesty International is calling on Nigerian authorities to investigate the alleged withdrawal of security forces of the Multi-National Joint Task Force (MNJTF) from Rann, which may have left tens of thousands of civilians exposed to this latest deadly attack.

“Boko Haram has consistently and deliberately targeted civilians in Rann, which makes the Nigerian authorities failure to protect people all the more unacceptable,” said Osai Ojigho.

“The authorities on both sides of the border must provide the supplies and safety that these people require. The Cameroonian authorities must also desist from forcing people to return until conditions are safe and they choose to do so voluntarily.”

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Media groups mourn slain Ghanaian Journalist in Nigeria

– March to Ghana High Commission, open a condolence register in Abuja

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The group holding a banner in solidarity with slain Ghanaian journalist, Ahmed Hussein-Suale

Journalists from SATELLITE TIMES newsroom, Safer Media Initiative (SMI) and colleagues from the Nigeria Union of Journalists (NUJ) Thursday in solidarity mourned the death of Ghanaian Journalist, Ahmed Hussein-Suale who was assassinated in his country on Wednesday, January 16.

Hussein-Suale, an undercover journalist with Tiger Eye, an investigative reporting project founded by Anas Aremeyaw Anas was shot three times by gunmen on a motor bike who eventually drove off without carting away with any valuables from his vehicle.

In solidarity to the fallen hero, journalists from SATELLITE TIMES, Safer Media Initiative and colleagues from the Nigeria Union of Journalist (NUJ) came out, dressed in black to mourn and also condemn the gruesome killing of Hussein-Suale. The ceremony is in continuation of a week-long activity in Abuja and Lagos by investigative reporters bent on seeking justice for their slain colleague in Ghana as well as upholding the ideals for which he gave his life.

Two days earlier, members of Safer Media Initiative took their solidarity march to the Ghana High Commission in Abuja where they called on the Ghanaian government to take action and further justice for the slain journalist.

Reacting to the murder, publisher of SATELLITE TIMES newspaper and multiple award-winning investigative journalist, Emmanuel Mayah, in strong terms condemned the act, adding that it is one too many on African journalists.

 Publisher of SATELLITE TIMES newspaper and multiple award-winning investigative journalist, Emmanuel Mayah

Publisher of SATELLITE TIMES newspaper and multiple award-winning investigative journalist, Emmanuel Mayah

Mayah used the medium to also encourage journalists not to fret or be discouraged by the attack on their colleague. Though he recognized the fact that the work of journalists in Africa is becoming increasingly difficult, he charged them to keep shinning light on the truth as they remain the defenders of the social contract, ridding the continent of corruption, bad governance and inequality.

In an earlier statement condemning the murder, Mayah said “We at SATELLITE TIMES newsroom join our colleagues in the global investigative journalism community in condemning the cowardly killing of this young journalist in Ghana. To Anas: we stand by you and share in your grief in this dark moment. To Ahmed’s family: the pain never goes away. To the government of Ghana we say: Journalists are not public enemy, rather they are protectors of the public interest; the defenders of the social contract between the citizens and the state.”

Journalists from SATELLITE TIMES newsroom took turns to sign a condolence register in memory and honour of Hussein-Suale.

Journalists from SATELLITE TIMES newsroom signing condolence register

Journalists from SATELLITE TIMES newsroom signing condolence register

Tony Icheku, a member of the NUJ in his condolence message said, “A threat to one is a threat to all. Ahmed Hussein-Suale’s death must not be in vain. RIP brother man!”

In his remark, the Executive Director of Safer Media Initiative, Peter Iorter said “it is unfortunate and worrisome that this has happened in Ghana, a country regarded as one of the most democratic countries in Africa and also ranking better than any other African country on the World Press Freedom index.”

Hussein-Suale was a member of the undercover team that exposed football corruption in Ghana and his last work, an investigation into ritual killings in Malawi published by the BBC.

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